Two types of fossil dating

Here is an easy-to understand analogy for your students: relative age dating is like saying that your grandfather is older than you.

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However, radioisotope dating may not work so well in the future.

Anything that dies after the 1940s, when Nuclear bombs, nuclear reactors and open-air nuclear tests started changing things, will be harder to date precisely.

The narrower a range of time that an animal lived, the better it is as an index of a specific time.

No bones about it, fossils are important age markers.

I also like this simple exercise, a spin-off from an activity described on the USGS site above.

Take students on a neighborhood walk and see what you can observe about age dates around you.

Unlike people, you can’t really guess the age of a rock from looking at it.

Yet, you’ve heard the news: Earth is 4.6 billion years old. That corn cob found in an ancient Native American fire pit is 1,000 years old. Geologic age dating—assigning an age to materials—is an entire discipline of its own.

It’s based either on fossils which are recognized to represent a particular interval of time, or on radioactive decay of specific isotopes. Based on the Rule of Superposition, certain organisms clearly lived before others, during certain geologic times.

After all, a dinosaur wouldn’t be caught dead next to a trilobite.

What’s more, if the whole rock is badly weathered, it will be hard to find an intact mineral grain containing radioactive isotopes.

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